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, send it to us, we had it on the air and a couple of minutes. because of technology, because of things changing so rapidly. it is a brand new world. vicki, thank you for the importance of that network and everything else. thank you. next, i want to introduce you to a gentleman. he is tall, dark, handsome. sorry, that was me. wrong script. [laughter] you, too, right? it's your birthday, right? ok. in all seriousness, a gentleman by the name of dmitri is here. i want you to meet him. his name is dmitri belzer. he has worked in the disability community for years providing technology access for more than 30 years. trained as a sign language expert and interpreter, he established a death services program ast san francisco state university, provided support services for colleges. we don't call them disabled. they happen to have a disability. he joined pacific bell, helped organize honda the advisory group for people that happen to have a disability. he gave them put to that company on how to develop features that will help them do better. he became the director of death and disabled services
, this is part of our broadband technology grant, the average cost is zero. [laughter] if you were to buy this for your home, it costs a couple of hundred dollars. the games cost between $20.40 dollars. they have hundreds of different games to play. to the games cost between $20.40 dollars. and hundreds of different games to play. we have other adaptive devices that can be used with the wii. this is a foot pedal. -- this is a foot pedal. along with the buttons on the hand device connected to alicia's remote, we can use foot pedals if there are games the require numerous controls. it is very adaptive. then, really interesting. what about someone who may be a quadriplegic and does not have the ability to use arms or legs? there is a sip and tug adapter that allows someone to control the wii with his or her mouth. you can still engaged the wii by puffing into the tube. this company has made the wii completely accessible for anyone to play. it is a great option. if you want more information about the adaptive equipment for the wii, visit alicia's booth. >> i work for the independent living ce
that because if it hits to the core of may. and that is why i have learned the necessary needs of technology whto learn and to grw at to do things. and why you and i need the things you're going to hear in just a couple of minutes. i just want to take a quick moment as you get settled. you will have to stop talking because i will not talk over you. you, too. i'm going to count to ten. i usually don't have to finish to ten. when you think of technology in the world today, we can't even imagine what is going to have the month from now. think of the things that have been eaten up. we used to have payphones. they are gone. the cellphone 8 it up. the cellphone 8 of the camera industry. you don't need to buy a camera. the cellphone 8 the watch industry. i don't even wear a watch. you can go through the list. he you don't have to go to the bank anymore. take a picture of a check and make a deposit. look at all the things that we have changed. and change every day. if we can't imagine what is going to happen by christmas time. you don't even have to go to the pharmacy to say, fill this out. pick up
for joining us and being part of this wonderful effort that we are announcing today with our technology community and certainly with the families of sandy hook. i would like to thank the families who flew all the way here from newtown, connecticut for joining us here today in san francisco. and while you are far away from home, i hope that you feel welcomed in our city. as a father of two girls myself, i can't imagine the pain and grief that you have suffered these past three months. and i have profound respect for your courage and for your commitment, for turning this grief into action. the tragic and horrifying events in sandy hook elementary school, touched every american, a tragedy of this magnitude brings along with it the pain, the shock, and the disbelief. and it forces all of us to ask the question how can we prevent such terrible events? how do we protect our children? our youth, our residents? for san francisco, it is very important for us to continue to have an open dialogue regarding gun violence so that we can answer these questions ourselves. today, we honored the three-mo
and supporting major advances in technology and recent history for them to turn their attention to solutions to gun violence, mental health, school safety and community. it gives me hope, at a time when hope is most needed. in my family is deeply grateful for this hope and to be part of this positive change that will benefit all of us in the future, thank you. >> ben and jeremy richmond. >> thank you, for having us today. thank you to the tech industry for coming to our aid. my name is jennifer hensel and this is my husband jeremy richmond, three months ago on december 14th, we lost our only child, daughter of 6 years aviel rose richmond. at the sandy hook elementary school shooting. on that day, mentally unstable gunman changed our lives and the lives of more than 25 other families in one of the worst ways imaginable. we are devastated. in the wake of our grief, and desperate to understand why someone would kill innocent children why someone would kill my child, we started the aveil foundation. jeremy and i are going to play to our strengths and answer the why. we are scientists and we see
drone technology -- demonstrates how prevalent drone technology is being affected. they can be purchased online for a few hundred dollars and then equipped with high definition video cameras without being detected. it is not hard to imagine the serious privacy problems this type of technology could cause. a state like mine, vermont, we protect and guard our privacy. this is raising some very serious questions from people from the far right to the far left. o we can't take a shortsighted view. technology in this area will advance at incredible rate. so i hope this hearing will just be the beginning of the dialogue. to help this committee explore some of these issues, senator grassley and i have invited witnesses who will testify. we'll hear from law enforcement officials as a fully operational unmanned unit. we'll hear from the leading unmanned vehicle industry group. a representative electronic privacy information center. and a scholar who has studied the intersection of drone technology. i appreciate them being here. senator grassley. >> before going to my statement, listening to you, i
to see the technology being created this year. mr. massey, what is it that than a makes -- that venom makes? >> it is a security product for your mobile device. the idea of data guard is that it is an encrypted network, link between your mobile device and the internet. from grabbinge your wi-fi connection and your data. there's a really big danger with mobile devices could people can read your password and user names -- devices. people can read your password and username and see what you're doing on the web. more and more people are having their data stolen by the data being grabbed on open wi-fi networks. this product stops that. >> so we're looking at a little package here. where is the actual data card? >> the data guard is a andection between a server an apple which you download onto your phone. -- app which you download onto your phone. you downloaded, enter a code which comes in this packaging, and away you go. >> is this on the market now. >> it's on the market right now. we are launching it to a number of stores in north america and europe. you can use it to geo-relocate. you'
we signaled from our technology company that is they were telling us that our payroll tax was a job-killing effort here that we had to change it. what we went ahead and fixed and it and got it done and after the dishandling of the redevelopment towards find a lasting solution to fund affordable house and is did that with the creation of affordable housing fund 30 million-dollar a year for the next 30 years to build affordable housings and to insentive eyes builders to get more housing on their sites and and invite police and firefighters into an emergency responders commute in san francisco to hmm with the down payments of the first too time home buyers efforts we were asked to vest? our neighborhood park and is streets and we did just that with our million dollar general obligation bond to build and construct more open space most importantly, we put san franciscans back to work and we have a growing economy and we have invested in our city. so the year of 20 if we will, was about getting everything done. and when we did that, we were complimented by an unemployment rate that w
absorb the culture and create. and you can look for us to be a technology hub going forward and we have never been followers. and have always been leaders. it's a very unique place and a great place to live. i relax by driving through and gatherings and reliving great memorize of being a kid in oakland and then i may end up just parking around little grand lake theatre and drive down and take a look at the paramount and so if there is a play that is happening and so the first thing that i tell people is go to jack land square and you will be surprised that we have a square and so shore line and it is the it could be the giving of great say food and go see things that inspire me about oakland is again it's ability to change. for every think that you would every say negative about oakland, i can say ten positives we are our own city. oakland to know it, is to love it.. >> (applause) all right. so thank you mayor khan and now we have for san francisco coming up and to sso to welcome mayor lee welcome kristine row wish senator vice senior vice president of service area of case zero per
we do what we do does insite having that knowledge sharing with other technology companies with the scientific community and art culture is critical. >> i think the biggest reason is that there is a support culture a lot of people going through the same thing are here and it's a challenge but there is people who are in that challenge with you >>> >>> in this case coming out of -- ([inaudible/incomprehensible] (music is very loud) . >> telling people from anywhere that you can live out your dreams here you can go forward and you won't be alone. there are other people who will join force with you >>> well if you have an interest in technology you are going to find more kindred spirit in the san francisco area than you will find anywhere else. you are also going to find an interesting opportunities in the most interesting innovative companies, on the earth. >> the talent that i can attract is the #1 determinant of whether we are success of or not and how successful we become and if i could attract the bets and brightest, then i would be at a competitive disadvantage
advances in television technology. the communicators winds up its visit to ces international 2013 the consumer electronics show enlace does. with a look at several booths to see some of the technologies being unveiled this year. >> host: joining us on the to mitigators is henry massey of the venom corporation. mr. massey what it is at that venom makes? >> guest: datagard is a security project for your mobile device. the idea of datagard is it makes an encrypted -- your wi-fi connection and stops people from grabbing your wi-fi connection and grabbing your data sent over the wi-fi connection. there's a really big danger with mobile devices when they are used on open wi-fi networks where people can read your meet your passwords and your usernames on your e-mail for see exactly what you are doing on the web. it's a big issue, really big issue these days and more more people are having their data stolen. this product stops that. >> host: we are looking at a little package here. where is the actual data card? >> guest: datagard is a combination between a server and we have servers in m
in kansas city, missouri. i employ over 150 people nationwide, providing technology services. i love what i do. i love seeing people thrive, be successful, be able to provide for their families. but i have three issues that small-business owners are facing. much and takee so some of the risks to have it taken away, i can talk about the taxes. anyone can take a look at their january pace of and see the difference. i would even begin to tell you what it means to a small- business owner. instead of being rewarded for saving, for operating reserves and putting aside for reading day, those are taken away. over one had 50 people working across the country to compete with the big companies to also do what i do. i have to provide very good services, very good health care and benefits, so i can track challenge. my check for my premiums today out of my come to any rigid out of my company is $21,000 per month. offor my premiums today out my company is $21,000 per month. revenue, thatonal is all going to hit the bottom line. shrugged? imposing regulations, taxes, additional policies that stifle creativ
of people can't afford that. and certainly visit one of these technology shops for a day or however long you need and try out some of the equipment. hackers are always with something that has come up a lot in contemporary culture. the one that i focused on in my book is a gentleman who famously broke into an iphone and a few years later into a sony playstation and was sued by sony. but eventually they hired him. [laughter] to help them figure out certain things. they certainly intercept. i think the main thing that is most important about this as there is there is a certain amount of humor to it. [laughter] >> there is a spirit of fun. they developed innovations because they were enjoying what they were doing. i think that that is the key element that is important. now i shall go back a little bit. in my book i sort of tried to get through the beginnings of american tinkering. we can talk about how this differs from tinkerers around the world. there was something about this country and our founding fathers seemed to be right in to our original history. obviously, ben franklin is one of the g
caught on but the idea of why all he built this gyroscopic technology into it said well you might want a wheelchair to climb up on the curbs were up the stairs. and so he invented this -- he came up with this ingenious technology to do that, he didn't catch on. they were expensive. he is probably best known for the sec'y built on the same technology as the walking wheelchair. and i guess the segue eventually became a little bit of a running joke. i don't know if you remember when it came out a number of years back it was hailed as the future of transportation coming out what's going to change the way he lived. unfortunately a lot of the big cities ban their use on sidewalks for one. they are still in use obviously. i think amazon uses them in the warehouses, and there are a lot of segue to worse around the country if she were in a city you can take a tour of the city in the sec'y. this technology is around, and maybe it will have bigger use in the future. the point is interesting is that he actually became a wealthy off of his inventions but if you look at sort of, you know, how they t
malibu triathlon at the finish line in september. >>> best to all of them. >> technology and fashion collide at the south by southwest festival. we'll show you how next. we'll show you how next. blab [ male announcer ] citibank's app for ipad makes it easy for anne to manage her finances when she's on the go. even when she's not going anywhere. citibank for ipad. easier banking. standard at citibank. okay. [ male announcer ] with citibank's popmoney, dan can easily send money by email right from his citibank account. nice job ben. [ male announcer ] next up, the gutters. citibank popmoney. easier banking. standard at citibank. blab. >>> this year at the south by southwest festival it is all about what you wear. we are talking about wearable computers, the trending music film, the technology event in austin, texas, showcases some of the hottest technologies every year and cnn money's lori segal was there and now back in new york. will you tell us anyway about these devices in style right now. what's so fashionable in the tech world? fashion is fashionable in the tech world. who would
technology is a one-stop shop. >>> the other thing that becomes very special is [inaudible] there is nowhere else go from here. . (applause) let me conclude with a little bit of sports and that is to say that, we are just about in spring training, world champions san francisco. also we are putting a bid together for super bowl 50, or 51 whichever one they will take, i'm be happy with that, yes, you know, we have got world baseball series coming in in march, in the at&t park, we have america's cup 55 days of sailing coming in the summer charles schwab cup in october and now, we are getting ready potentially to have more international sporting ebbs that really come to compliment what we do not just in san francisco but for the whole bay area and i want to suggest to you that we have an opportunity to do that through the one s f program that we created to sustain all of the theater we are doing to make sure we do it right with your help. and i'll say to you're to you and i think i have said this in some other circles, knowing when we were at the five-yard line, ethree min
with the san francisco citizens initiative for technology and innovation. it's a consortium of companies representing 25,000 employees. >> the hope is we can generate thousands of dollars of resources that will go into direct services to help people on the streets. >> reporter: resources including volunteers, money and even software. >> there is a lot of creative capital that's out. >> reporter: tech company neighborhoodland was on site to encourage the public to use its site to brainstorm solutions. >> people have thought about this issue. it confronts all of us on a day- to-day basis. >> reporter: they hope tech companies will help streamline the process to get services. >> a lot of things are done on paper. paper takes forever. if people could do the sign up now then they could have access to the services sooner. >> reporter: advocates say they hope the tech companies can help clear up backlogs, section 8 and public housing lists and provide jobs for skilled homeless workers. >>> in los angeles county former bell mayor oscar hernandez and four counc
time. we have spoken in the past about using dna technology to solve serious crimes. 2007 was a time around /2008 when the crime lab had an enormous backlog of samples. it was a lot of work, but by using technology and with the support of this committee, the fbi has cleared the backlog. a report from 2010 found there was a substantial fbi dna case or a backlog, but an update published in september found the backlog is now very low and well managed. in both cases, i commend you and your staff for their hard work in bringing that up to date. have no doubt that by improving turnaround time for dna evidence, that we are solving serious crimes and preventing additional people from becoming victims. there are many state and local crime labs around the country that have not been as successful as the fbi. i hope that you and the fbi lab can share the lessons you have with state and local governments. i want to touch on familial search, which we have talked about before. this is a method of searching offender dna database system determined its dna from a crime scene has a familial relationshi
was she was telling us to go forward 2030 in term of technologies and looking back to today. but this conference with all the vendors we had here had an amazing impact on me as learning of new technologies. i really feel in the 21st century of different types of technologies. i'm not going to make any pitches here. but bottom line is we are learning and this conference to me, and i know for many of us here, it was a great learning experience. thank you. >> awesome, thank you. (applause) >> thank you. all right. if we don't have any more questions, i'm going to give it over to drew to do his little sales pitch up there. or any announcements that need to be made. >> [speaker not understood]. >> okay, do you want the microphone? i'll hold it. i'm kidding. here you go. >> i'm obviously part of the nonprofit [speaker not understood], i have a products company. and for what it's worth, it hasn't gone to development yet. but we have a one-coat film that so far is working on traffic signs with unlimited cleanings. once it goes to market we'll let you know at the 2013 conference. we'
are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with o
together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very positive way. from my perspective, it's important for us to keep on pushing data sets that allow us to deal with the sometimes imperfections in city government. to figure it out, where it is we need to take risks, we are we can be more entrepreneurial, where we can be more transparent and frank little more accountable to all of you as the residents and as our customers here in city government. and this is why i am proud tomorrow to help move forward legislation that my staff has been workin
, with a look at several booths to see some of the technology that's being unveiled this year. >> host: and now joining us on "the communicators" is henry massey of the venom corporation. mr. massey -- >> guest: hello. >> host: -- what is it that venom makes? >> guest: well, we actually are producing a product here called data guard. it's a scooter product for your mobile twice. now, the idea of data guard is it makes an encrypted link between your mobile device and the internet which stops people grabbing your wi-fi connection and grabbing your data sent over the wi-fi connection. it's a really big danger with mobile devices when they're used on open wi-fi networks, people can read your passwords or user names on your e-mail or see what you're doing on the web. it's a really big issue these days, and more and more people are having their data stolen on open wi-fi networks. this product stops that. >> host: so we're looking at a little paneling here. where is the -- a little package here. where is the actual data card? >> guest: actually a combination between a server, and we have servers in a
and flooding and you can see the subheaders from there. the technological and this is what one should do when you are conducting vunerbility. and technological hazards or hazards that are accidents and think of india and hazmat event, something where the transit center night not be the target. but they will receive collateral damage. some of these are very important to look at, scoring them cals and radiology and hospitals. >> have you to look at it across the board and we look at above and underground storage tanks and pipelines and if they rupture how will that effect the transit center. rail and air, of course your standard hazmat events, a truck something like that on the street near or around the center itself. man made is criminal acts, violence against property and in relation to the transit center. you think that everything from a violent act to graffiti, how are you going to try to buy down that threat and risk. we look at fire events, and plan to be 100-year building within those 100 years, we anticipate that you will have a fire event, a trash, can or a bus so we need recommendatio
. a big logo slide. >> and we're supposed to be about the technology. >> imagine a big stop bullying speak up logo on the slide behind me. >> say that again. >> stop bullying, speak up is the name of the campaign and a nice transition. my complements to everyone in the room. if i have learned everything in the last four years while researching bullying prevention and for our age group and the kids in the second through seventh grade it's that not only does it take a village but a village of people who are willing to partner and collaborate with each other and speak not only to adults about this issue but speak to children and i think it's an interesting transition from mia's work to mine. still not mine. >> it is but -- >> and the role we play at cartoon network and thousands of kids at home everyday and the role we play is taking that information, translating it and content on the line and when kids come independently to our screens to play games and watch television and do a variety of things we have information for them on information they care deeply part. in 2008 as research we do
to be with the talented and with oakland being the liberator and home of the -- technology in general and thriving arts and cutting edge innovation in general in areas we really have the talent here in the bay area and i think that is critical and also, i think we are looking at investors internationally and frankly at an -- promising a lot of our time to chinese investors and really an international economy but we are looking at not just across the country but to invest and -- in the bay area and it's not goal of -- 50% there and to ed we are a region and many of these companys are going to be make this horizontal and vertical -- chinese investors in the entire bay area and so they have to have it's a different game. and you know, texans have to live there. the reality is that this is one of the most beautiful places with the best whrr and -- [inaudible] company that is going to for tech assistance on your software and you get somebody in india well they are actually -- because oakland they are putting a call center in oakland to get a quicker turn around and -- in many languages and that is an inno
of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. you'll only find sleep number at one of our over 400 stores nationwide. where queen mattresses start at just $699. and right now enjoy the lowest prices of the season on our most popular bed sets. sleep number. comfort individualized. . >> happening right now on cnn a college sports team on the way to a game when their bus crashes. two on board are dead and many others hurt. >>> another crash in florida and this one is a hot air balloon and among them injured is an nfl player. the latest on his condition. >>> oh, bloomberg is not around, our big gulp is safe. >> sarah palin takes on mayor bloomberg and the gop. >>> and plus a grisly discovery at an airport. maintenance workers discover a body in an elevator shaft. >>> accusations of rape and aer town torn apart and marathon trial days and it has come down to a verdict happening in 12 hour hours. tomorrow the judge will give his verdict of the trial of two high school boys who are accused of raping a 16-yea
. a collection of innovations designed around a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the support your body needs - each of your bodies. you'll only find sleep number at one of our over 400 stores nationwide. where queen mattresses start at just $699. and right now enjoy the lowest prices of the season on our most popular bed sets. sleep number. comfort individualized. >>> today marks two weeks since an elementary school teacher disappeared in new orleans. she hasn't been seen since leaving a bar after a night out with friends. her car is also missing. police have no suspects. earlier i asked the missing woman's mother what investigators have discovered so far. >> they haven't found anything yet connected with my daughter, her car, clothing, nothing has been located as of yet. >> investigators have been focusing on the bayous and the waterways in the surrounding area thinking in some way she may have driven her car into those or maybe someone put her there. i hate to say that to you. do you think she possibly because on the night she went missing, when she left par
our outreach to touch everyone in today's demographic and modernize our technology to reach people where they live today. change must be constant. it does not mean we have to be less conservative. we already have one liberal party in this country. we do not need a second one. [applause] even president ronald reagan said, "freedom is the right to question and change the established way of doing things. it is the continuous revolution of the marketplace. it is the understanding that allows us to recognize shortcomings and seek solutions." 1988 in these words in moscow to some university students. it was timely for the russian people then, and it is a message we conservatives need to hear now. conservatives' bedrock principle has always been individual liberty, the believe that our rights were given to us by our creator, not the government. [applause] the rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. individual liberty -- that is what drove president abraham lincoln and the emancipation of the slaves. it will is what drove republican susan b. anthony in her campaign for women
agree that technology, expediting our kids earlier with the expectation for college and seth them to in our economies is the keys key to success and we're making progress. san francisco unified continues to be the hive urban development are high. we've seen double digit high-grades among our latin and africa kids >> results are being recognized for our achievement we received a federal grab the to bring job training in our mission neighborhood. the supervisor knows about this. these gains are possible because reforms are underway the partnership are in place. for our kids to succeed in this economy we must do more. that's why this year i will propose in my budgeted more resources more than $50,000,000,000 and $25 million for preschool activities. i view education as an be investment not an expense. the folk in the road for many kids and many families the point at which they decide they're though stay in san francisco or leave. you're going to hear me talking about this layoff a lot this year. i want our middle squirrels to courthousess choose the road to success notes the road th
. >> and at that point the data would be available for developers; the technology, already exists. it could be an existing app maker who plugs in and goes from 700 cabs to 1700 cabs; it could be a new player. that part we would not control the timeline but given what we have seen in terms of the demand for this kind of way to access transportation, and we're fairly confident that that would happen fairly quickly. >> mine is quick. director heinicke covered most of the things i want to talk about. thank you for the research; you have made a lot of progress. congratulations to you and your staff. >> thank you. >> i want to go back to mr. -- made the point when he invested a lot of money in apps, i think director reiskin said, even if they invested in apps, they can be used in open architecture. have you taken into consideration what is out there? >> it is appropriate to allow companies that have a pride in their brand, to develop their own apps; if they want to offer and app with only their taxis, we should allow that exist. we don't want to interfere with that brand. we want people to be abl
, working with existing technology providers. >> thank you. >> (calling names) >> good afternoon. >> also it's not going to be relevant to the subject, i thought we would be discussing the issue of having electronic weigh bills which is finished and done with, i want to express my opposition; we don't need anybody to bake through our information; it is not fair to have our financial data access by third parties or more. and we really think that by doing that process, it's nothing but adding another stress to what you have already seen here, with poor men working for their families; it's going to be another burden for them. i am sorry but // thank you very much. >> mark gruber, -- >> thank you. mark gruber. united taxicab workers. we desperately need electronic taxicab access. it should be done in the form of a single app put out my contract through an rfp instead of having some multitude of apps fighting among each other. you might have gotten a glimmer from the taxi magic representative. this is something that needs to be done right. and the only way i can see doing it right is to have
. the technology network in san jose who made this a crucial project. i want to call out a thanks to or tactical team. we know how to make it small, not over 150 feet in the air. we have a studio, zone engineering and i have to say thanks to hmr who has been a rock star and directly one of the reasons this is happening. an extremely talented project. thank you all. i also want to just take a moment to really acknowledge that while leo and i have done a lot of things m in this world, we would not be able to do it alone. there is only one person responsible for this project and that is executive director of the arts. luminarias. i can go on and on. i think i will throughout the night. do know that she's a special person and this entire community owes her a debt of gratitude. i want to thank leo and his family for bringing the level of artistic integrity for this work that somehow slipped through the progress of a work of contemporary art parallel in art history. it has everything to do with leo and our interpretations with our discussion and that one minute that transformed how people will be rec
. and learn how technology is changing the world of forecasting. >>> san francisco bay area is highly vulnerable to natural hazards like earthquakes, wildfires and severe weather. so we have created one place for you to find all the resources and tips you need to be prepared. visit abc7news.com/prepare norcal and learn how you can keep you and your family safe. >> climate changes seems to have come upon us so suddenly, even though they were telling us 30 years and 40 years ago we could expect the weather conditions we have seen globally in the last five to ten years. it was five years ago because what human beings were putting in the atmosphere we could expect these climb changes. we are seeing seeing more frequent and extreme storms. >> being a communicator, you want to be fair and open. you don't want to worry people or scare people. you know people are smart. they know about their weather. they know about their climate. they know that it is changing. >> certainly on the global scale you have these temperatures rising over the past few decades. there is no question about it. the num
, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engin
and disability technology summit. it was approximately a month ago that secretary kathleen sebelius said the u.s. department of health and human services announced the creation of this new federal agency, and that is the administration for community living. and in her words, she said "for too long, too many americans have faced the a possible choice between moving to an institution or living at home without the long-term services and support they need." so this new administration for community living will be to helping people with disabilities, as well as seniors, to live a productive, satisfying lives. now, as you may be aware, the aging and disability population has been recognized actually at the local and state levels for quite some time now. so the mechanisms for providing support that facility community living have been really brought together into local and state agencies such as the san francisco departments the of aging and adult services that serves those populations since the year 2000. yet, at the federal level, policy developments from a community outreach, and program implementat
finishing in the green. some records also hit today, honeywe honeywell, united technology, and travelers hitting all-time highs. and cliffs natural resources, we have seen general weakness in iron/ore pricing over the past week or so, when iron ore gets low, it can mean rough sledding for cliffs. also, electronic arts getting hit today. it was your worst performer in the s&p. the company expects revenue and earnings per share at the current quarter to be at the low end of or slightly below its year end forecast. harley davidson, no easy ride today for hog. retail sales for january and february may have been down 4% to 5% 7. and adobe systems just out with earnings, beat on the top and bottom line. that stock spiking in the after-hours. back to you guys, maria. >> thank you so much, josh. and as you just mentioned, adobe up better than 5% after report earnings that beat expectations. take a look at the chart. right after the break, we will take you live to adobe headquarters in san jose, dig into the numbers with an exclusive interview with adobe's ceo. >>> later on, the nfl looking for a
and technology and accountability. freedom solves problems that government cannot. education equals freedom. we are creating a pocket of freedom by embracing our budget every single year and passing it in a balanced way. we are showing the federal government that you don't have to spend money that you don't have. we are creating a pocket of freedom by lowering taxes and regulations on business so we can hire more floridians instead of people paying more for their government. let me tell you one more way we are planning a flag -- planting a flag in our state. there is an increasing trend in washington that someone described as cartel federalism. states are being lured -- i would argue, coerced -- into expanding programs like medicaid and passing regulations federal mandate, but with the promise of free money. they are trying to buy us off. one by one. i am not buying it. florida will not buy it, and america should not buy it. [applause]we will stand up to their inflexible plans and work in our own solution. one that better reflects the needs and priorities of our state. here is the bottom line.
in power, with sewer, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy gene
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